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OSA Student Wellness

Services, Support, & Information

Welcome to the OSA Student Wellness Website.  OSA strives to create and promote an environment that allows for vulnerability and imperfection to support self growth, self awareness, and self care.  We work as a team and partner with you to support your growth not only as a student and medical professional, but also as a human being.

We hope you find this website useful; however, if you aren’t able to find the information you’re looking for or have feedback/suggestions, feel free to contact Dr. Burgess or Dr. Teranishi or leave anonymous feedback/suggestions at our electronic Suggestions & Feedback “Box”.

Lawrence Burgess, MD
Title: Director of Student Affairs
Email: lburgess@hawaii.edu
Phone: (808) 692-1000
Kristen Teranishi, MD
Title: Assistant Director of Student Affairs
Email: kteranis@hawaii.edu
Phone: (808) 692-1006

Visit the COVID-19 Resources & Updates page for COVID-19 related information, resources, and updates.

FAQs/Concerns About Seeking HelpCounseling and Mental Health Support & ServicesPeer to Peer Wellness Support & ActivitiesHelping a ClassmateStudent Well-Being HandbookStudent Wellness Activities & Events
Students hesitate to seek help for various reasons.  Below you will find a list of frequently asked questions and concerns around seeking help.  We hope these answers will provide you with assurance that it is okay to seek help.

What are common themes students seek help for?
The following list contains common themes that medical students seek help for.  This list is not inclusive, and students should not feel hesitant to reach out for any reason.

  • General wellness support
  • Adjusting to medical school
  • Academic concerns
  • Self esteem, identity concerns
  • Normal reactions to common stressors
  • Family concerns
  • Health concerns (physical and mental)
  • Mood/emotional concerns
  • Friendship/relationship conflicts
  • Disordered eating behaviors
  • Substance abuse concerns
  • Concern for classmate
  • Title IX issues
  • Financial Concerns
What resources are available to me for counseling and mental health support?
Who may I talk to for advising and general counseling?
In general, faculty in OSA, OME, and Learning Communities (LCs) can be sought out for advising and general counseling.

Academic Advising – Office of Medical Education (OME), Course Directors, LC Mentors, OSA

Career Counseling/Advising – OME and Clinical Faculty, OSA (Dr. Burgess & Dr. Teranishi), LC Mentors

General Wellness Counseling – OSA (Dr. Burgess & Dr. Teranishi), LC Mentors

For more detailed information on who you can talk to for advising and general counseling at OSA and LCs, please go to the Counseling and Mental Health Support & Services tab and look at the Office of Student Affairs (OSA), JABSOM and Learning Community Advisor/Mentor, JABSOM sections.

I’d like to talk to someone (personal issue, leave of absence, academic performance, questionable incident) but not sure who to go to.  Is there anyone I can talk to who can advise me without having to report issues?
For personal issues, any advisor that the student feels comfortable with can be approached.  LC mentors and OSA faculty may be the most approachable for these types of issues.  OSA faculty would probably be the best resource for leave of absence or a questionable incident, since they have administrative knowledge of how the student would be able to manage the problem.  In general, only Title IX or safety concerns require further reporting.  For academic issues, any faculty can be reached out to such as the course or clerkship director, but the LC mentor serves as the student’s academic advisor.  The learning specialist at OSA can provide specific support for time management and study concerns.
Who may I talk to for psychological and/or psychiatric mental health needs?
Go to the Counseling and Mental Health Support & Services tab for listings of psychological and psychiatric resources and services.  JABSOM’s Confidential Counselor would likely be your first resource to seek help from directly, but if you are unsure on how to proceed, do not hesitate to reach out to LC mentors or OSA faculty who might assist as necessary.
I’m hesitant to get help from or talk about personal issues with OSA because Dr. Burgess and Dr. Teranishi write our Medical Student Performance Evaluation letter (a.k.a. MSPE, Dean’s Letter).
Dr. Burgess and Dr. Teranishi serve as student advocates, and concerns brought by students remain confidential, unless there is Title IX or other safety concern. 

In writing the Dean’s letter, Drs. Burgess and Teranishi work closely with students in developing three topics that the student wants to highlight.  Students review and help to modify these topic areas based on their desires.  The remainder of the Dean’s letter is provided verbatim from course evaluations, and in certain situations, have some summary statements required by the AAMC.  In short, the composition of the Dean’s letter should not deter a student from seeking counseling from OSA.

Do the Learning Community Mentors contribute to my MSPE?
LC mentors do not have an evaluatory role for the students in their learning community group and therefore their comments are not included in the student’s MSPE.
Do the Learning Community Mentors have a role in my evaluations?
LC mentors serve as a student’s mentor and advisor.  They will have no direct evaluatory role for the students within their own learning community group.  The LC mentors will have access to a student’s evaluations for their advising sessions.  In some situations (e.g., BPES checklist, clinical skills assessments), the LC mentors may have an evaluatory role for students not within their LC group.
I don’t want to seek help from OSA because I’m afraid I will be told that I have to take time off from school for a year, and I don’t want to be behind and this will provide financial strain, and I am concerned about what this would look like on residency applications.
OSA cannot order a student to take time off from school.  Students must voluntarily request to take time off from school, and they seek approval through the Director of OSA, who can award up to a year off.  The Evaluation Review and Remediation Committee (ERRC) can recommend remediation following an Incomplete or a Failed course, and the Student Standing and Promotion Committee (SSPC) can recommend a student take time off for academic or professionalism concerns.  OSA faculty are not voting members on either of these committees.
I’m considering taking time off, but I’m unsure who to talk to.  Does this look bad on my record?  Will I have to state why I’m taking time off?
Schedule a meeting with OSA, as the Director of OSA can grant up to a year off for personal reasons.  Time off that leads to a delay in graduation needs to be explained in the MSPE.  If it is voluntary and not mandated by the SSPC, this is usually annotated as shown in the following examples: “MS John Doe took 1 year off for personal reasons”; “MS John Doe took 1 year off for medical reasons”; “MS John Doe took 1 year off for a research year in his desired specialty of ophthalmology.”
If I seek help, is anyone at JABSOM notified?
If you are seeking mental health support from UH Counseling and Development Center (CSDC), JABSOM’s Confidential Counselor, or community mental health providers, JABSOM is not notified.  Details of counseling and medical care are confidential and not reported to JABSOM.

If you are seeking help from LC mentors or OSA faculty, confidentiality is respected.  Oftentimes sharing information between selected faculty members or mentors is to the benefit of the student for coordinated and optimal support; however, the student should give approval for information to be shared among selected faculty and/or mentors.

Please note that LC mentors and OSA faculty are not Title IX confidential resources and would be required to report a Title IX issue if one is disclosed to them.  LC mentors and OSA faculty can support you in reporting Title IX issues or refer you to a confidential resource whom you can speak openly to before making the choice whether or not to report the issue.  For more information on who you can speak to about Title IX issues/reporting, please go to the pull down titled:  I have a Title IX issue, and I feel very uncomfortable going to my LC mentor or OSA. Who can I go to?

If I am under my parents’ medical insurance and I see a private/community psychologist or a psychiatrist, will this show up on my parents billing or records?
If you are a student under your parent’s health insurance plan, you may contact your insurance carrier to request for confidential communications such that insurance information is directly sent to you.  If not having confidential communications with your insurer is a barrier to you accessing necessary mental health resources then that can be considered “endangerment”.  The form can be accessed on the HMSA website.  For other insurance carriers, you may need to talk to member services to obtain the form.
I’d like to talk to someone or get help.  However, I’ve heard that some residency and licensing applications ask for mental health history/therapy/diagnoses.  Is this true?
Most residency applications are standardized through ERAS, and do not appear to ask for this history.  This topic was reviewed in one recent article: To Disclose or Not: Residency Application and Psychiatric Illness.  However, once accepted, you will have to apply to the state licensing board as a resident physician.

Medical licensing boards have variable approaches to this problem, despite the fact that asking a question like this violates the American Disability Act (ADA).  Some states ask if you have any illness that impairs your ability to be a physician, while others ask if you have a psychiatric diagnosis.  The first implies that if you are under proper treatment, then you would answer no and not have to disclose your diagnosis.  The second requires one to answer yes, even if you are under treatment.  Answering yes may not bar you from state licensure, but it may mean that you are tracked as an “impaired provider.”  The topic of state licensure is thoroughly reviewed, state by state, in a recent article Medical Licensure Questions About Mental Illness and Compliance with the Americans With Disabilities Act.

I don’t want to seek help because I’m afraid that faculty/classmates will think that I’m not strong/tough enough to be in medicine (I’m too weak for medicine).
The study and practice of medicine is intense.  Medical student and physician burnout is a very common and well-recognized outcome of our highly stressful profession.  If burnout is not recognized and managed, devastating results for the individual can and will ensue, as well as potentially poor patient outcomes.  We can only encourage and recommend you seek help.  Seeking help is a sign of strength and a step toward improving and growing yourself.
I don’t have private insurance and don’t know where to seek help.
As a JABSOM student, you are eligible for services at UH Manoa’s Counseling and Student Development Services (CSDC) or JABSOM’s Confidential Counselor.  There is no cost or insurance needed for these counseling services, which are included in your Student Health Fee.

For a summary of these services, go to our Counseling and Mental Health Support & Services tab.  You will also find online mental health resources that do not require insurance under the Community Mental Health Providers & Services section within the same tab.

Crisis hotlines and the emergency room should be utilized for crisis situations.

I’m afraid to ask for help or share my concerns with faculty because they talk to each other/gossip/have their favorites.
OSA, LC mentors, and CSDC are not in the evaluation realm of the students and keep confidentiality, so therefore having a “favorite in the class” or promoting gossip should not be a problem.  However, if you find this to be the case, you may report it to OSA via the Anonymous Online Report of Student Mistreatment. 

You can also anonymously report concerns about professionalism at JABSOM via JABSOM’s Professionalism Concern Form. The Ombudsman reviews the reports weekly and will notify leadership of the relevant department, program, or office.

Are Learning Communities graded?
LCs are part of the MD curriculum for years 1-4 and are a component of each of course, but LCs are not a separately graded course.
How can Learning Community Mentors Contribute to my well-being?
During each of the advising sessions the Learning Community Mentors will discuss aspects of your wellness including your physical, mental, spiritual and relationship well-being while reviewing your wellness plans.  Advising sessions will generally occur one per unit during the MS1 and MS2 years and twice a year during the MS3 and MS4 year.

You are encouraged to contact your Learning Community Mentor at any time if you have any questions or concerns and they can help direct you to the appropriate resources.  One of the main objectives of Learning Communities is also to assist students in well-being.  The Learning Community curriculum has sessions specifically designed to address well-being.

I have a Title IX issue, and I feel very uncomfortable going to my LC mentor or OSA. Who can I go to?
Direct access to the JABSOM Title IX or UH Manoa Title IX office may be made, bypassing LC mentors, OSA.

Corrine Seymour
JABSOM
Deputy Title IX Coordinator
cseymour@hawaii.edu
Dee Uwono
UH Manoa
Director and Title IX Coordinator
deeuwono@hawaii.edu

You may also speak to a confidential resource before deciding whether or not to speak to a Title IX officer.  Confidential Advocates, Health Services, and Mental Health Counselors are designated as confidential resources on your campus.  Going to a Confidential Resource will not put UH on notice of a specific allegation.

Confidential Resources provide a variety of services including:

  • Mental health support and counseling
  • Safety Planning
  • Navigating and accessing your rights and resources on and off campus
  • Assistance with deciding whether you would like to report to the University
  • Assistance with reporting to local police
There are multiple resources at JABSOM, UH Manoa, and the community to seek access to counseling and mental health support.  The most important thing is to reach out to seek support through one of the various methods based on your preference.

Office of Student Affairs (OSA), JABSOM
OSA provides general counseling regarding issues students may have and serves as a triage resource for students to access other support mechanisms.  These support mechanisms include University of Hawaii resources, providers in the community, and urgent resources.  All OSA faculty serve in non-supervisory and non-evaluative roles.

Below are general guidelines for who you can reach out to at OSA based on different concerns that commonly affect student well-being.  However, feel free to reach out to OSA faculty member(s) of your preference.  Reaching out to an OSA faculty or staff member is not limited to the issues listed below.  For a full listing of OSA faculty and staff members, please visit About OSA.

Lawrence Burgess, MD
Director of Office of Student Affairs
lburgess@hawaii.edu

Kristen Teranishi, MD
Assistant Director of Office of Student Affairs
kteranis@hawaii.edu

Dr. Burgess and Dr. Teranishi have administrative knowledge of how students can manage an issue or problem.  You can seek out either of them for the following:

  • General guidance and counseling (academic, personal)
  • General wellness counseling and concerns
  • Career counseling
  • Assistance in finding help, if unsure about getting help
  • Leave of absence
  • Questionable incident
  • Student mistreatment
  • Title IX issues/reporting Title IX issue (note:  they are not Title IX confidential resources, but can refer you to Title IX confidential resources)
  • Professionalism concern
  • Extracurricular activities
  • Student advocacy
  • Questions or concerns
Sharleen Chock, PhD
Learning Specialist
sharleen.chock@hawaii.edu
  • Provides learning assistance
  • Help with time management
  • Creates individualized education plans based on the results of the learning assessments
  • Assists with and addresses skills development and learning issues and concerns
  • Assists with preparation for USMLE Step exams
Helen Helmlinger
Scholarship Director & Financial Aid Counselor
medfas@hawaii.edu
  • Financial concerns
  • Concern about scholarship funding if going on leave of absence
  • Enhance your financial knowledge
  • Help with managing finances
  • Debt management counseling
Learning Community Advisor/Mentor, JABSOM
Learning Communities is a system that was developed to encourage students to approach their mentors for general counseling (eg., general academic concerns, personal concerns, topics discussed in LCs). The mentors are in non-supervisory and non-evaluative roles, and will assist in triage of students to other resources.

Learning Communities (LCs) faculty:

NameEmailMoku GroupMoku Director/LC Mentor
Sheri Fong, MD, PhDsherif@hawaii.eduʻEwaMoku Director
William Fong, MDwltfong@hawaii.eduʻEwa MaukaLC Mentor
Jannet Lee-Jayram, MDjannet98@hawaii.eduʻEwa MakaiLC Mentor
Dee Ann Carpenter, MDdeeannc@hawaii.eduWaiʻanaeMoku Director
Sandi Uchida, MDstsumoto@hawaii.eduWaiʻanae MaukaLC Mentor
Daniel Murai, MDmuraid@hawaii.eduWaiʻanae MakaiLC Mentor
Jill Omori, MDjill.omori@hawaii.eduWaialuaMoku Director
Celia Ona, MDcona@hawaii.eduWaialua MaukaLC Mentor
Christian Kitamura, MDcyk@hawaii.eduWaialua MakaiLC Mentor
Martina Kamaka, MDmartinak@hawaii.eduKoʻolauloaMoku Director
Kyra Len, MDkyra@hawaii.eduKoʻolauloa MaukaLC Mentor
Ricky Amii, MDramii@hawaii.eduKoʻolauloa MakaiLC Mentor
Richard Kasuya, MDkasuya@hawaii.eduKoʻolaupokoMoku Director
Travis Hong, MDtravhong@hawaii.eduKoʻolaupoko MaukaLC Mentor
Vanessa Wong, MDwongvanz@hawaii.eduKoʻolaupoko MakaiLC Mentor
David Horio, MDdhorio@hawaii.eduKonaMoku Director
Mark Pian, MDmspian@hawaii.eduKona MaukaLC Mentor
Laurie Tam, MDlmtam@hawaii.eduKona MakaiLC Mentor
Confidential Counselor, JABSOM
Confidential Counselor:  Haylin Dennison, LCWS
Phone:  (808) 364-7592
Website:Haylin Dennison, LCSW
Address:  401 Kamakee Street, Suite 305, Honolulu, HI 96814
Sessions:  Saturdays, 8:00am – 3:00pm

Secondary Confidential Counselor:  Monique Haas, LMHC
Phone:  (808) 364-7592
Website:Haylin Dennison, LCSW
Address:  401 Kamakee Street, Suite 305, Honolulu, HI 96814
Sessions:  Thursdays, 5:00pm – 9:00pm, Telehealth Only

JABSOM medical students can receive confidential counseling with licensed clinical therapist Haylin Dennison, LCSW.

  • Students can schedule an appointment through the website or by phone

    • On the website, scroll down to the Work with Me section and click on Learn More under For Health Care Professionals to request an appointment
  • Telehealth sessions will be provided
  • In-person counseling sessions may be requested
  • Service is free, however, students needing long-term care will be transitioned to payment through their health insurance plan and referred to a provider in the community

    • Referral to Haylin for long-term service or through other therapists in her group may be possible depending on demand
UH Manoa Counseling and Student Development Center (CSDC)
As a JABSOM student, you are eligible for services at UH Manoa’s Counseling and Student Development Services (CSDC).

  • CSDC offers a variety of counseling services — personal counseling, couples, group counseling, career counseling, peer support spaces, psychiatric consultation and emergency / crisis services to meet the needs of students in support of their academic, career, and personal goals.  All appointments are currently held via telehealth (Zoom)
  • There is no cost or insurance needed for CSDC counseling services as services are included in your Student Health Fee
  • Therapists are familiar with issues commonly affecting students
  • Services are confidential (nothing is reported to JABSOM) and counselors are also Title IX confidential resources
  • Students can meet with a CSDC counselor for 4-6 sessions. Students needing longer-term or specialist services can get help through CSDC with referrals to providers outside of UH
  • Students can explore other CSDC offerings such as skills based workshops and student support spaces. Offerings particularly relevant to JABSOM students are listed in the JABSOM Student Wellness Calendar.

Establishing service with CSDC:

  • Takes 2 – 3 weeks to set up sessions (4 – 6 sessions)
  • All students start off with a brief telephone “screener” appointment with a CSDC counselor before initiating services. Students call (808) 956-7927 to schedule an initial telephone screener during CSDC business hours: Monday – Friday 8:30 – 4:30pm
  • CSDC psychologist then does initial meeting and sets up referral to CSDC psychologist

CSDC Crisis services are available Monday – Friday (except holidays) 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. by calling (808) 956-7927.

If you need to talk to someone on an emergency basis after 4:30 p.m. or during weekends and holidays, you may choose to call the Crisis Line of Hawaiʻi at (808) 832-3100.

Community Mental Health Providers & Services
Community Mental Health Providers:

  • Vetted List of Mental Health Providers:
    This list of mental health care providers was vetted by psychiatrist Dr. Anthony Guerrero.  The providers listed shouldn’t have an affiliation with JABSOM, but please double check with staff before making an appointment with a provider.
  • Psychology Today Database:
    This database is provides a simple way to search providers based on information such as location of practice, type of insurance accepted, types of therapy practiced, gender of provider, credentials, specialties, etc.  Your search will yield results containing detailed bios and information about each therapist.
  • Hawaii Psychological Association (HPA) Locator:
    If you are looking for a licensed psychologist or an HPA member mental health professional, this on-line locator can help you locate and obtain contact information for licensed providers.
  • Sex Abuse Treatment Center (SATC):
    This center provides a breadth of services for those who have experienced sexual assault recently or in the past.

Online Mental Health Services:

  • HMSA Online Care App:
    HMSA’s Online Care is available to anyone in Hawaii, 18 years or older.  You don’t have to be an HMSA member to use Online Care.  In addition to mental health care providers, over 900 healthcare providers were added (since COVID) for this online care service.  There’s usually not more than a 10-minute wait to see a provider.

    Cost:  For HMSA members your cost is between $0 to $15 depending on your health plan.  The cost will show on the page before you begin.  It’s also available in your Guide to Benefits in My Account on the HMSA website.

    For non-HMSA members:  Your cost depends on the provider you choose.  It will show on the page before you start your visit.

  • Hawaii Pro Bono Mental Health Center:
    No cost telehealth services for those without health care insurance.
  • Physician Support Line:
    This free, confidential support line is staffed by psychiatrists.  It provides support for medical students, residents, and fellows, 8am-1am Eastern Time, 7 days a week.  Visit the website or call (888) 409-0141.
Urgent/Crisis Resources
  • Call 911 or go to the nearest Emergency Room
  • Hawaii Cares – 24/7 Crisis Line of Hawaii at (808) 832-3100 (Oahu); 1-(800)-753- 6879 (Neighbor Island).  This is a free local, mental health and substance use call center.  Support adults and adolescents through crisis, treatment, and recovery.
  • Ku Makani by Hawaii CARES – COVID crisis counseling support by phone Oahu (808) 832-3100 or toll-free 1 (800) 753-6879; free online virtual group sessions and more.
  • Crisis Text Line – text ALOHA to 741-741
  • National Suicide Prevention Lifeline – 1-800-273-TALK
  • Lifeline Crisis Chat – Online Messaging
  • Self-Harm Hotline – 1-800-DONT CUT (1-800-366-8288)
  • National Crisis Line – Anorexia & Bulimia (1-800-233-4357)
  • GLBT National Help Center Hotline – 1-888-843-4564
  • National Council on Alcoholism & Drug Dependency Hope Line – 1-800-622-2255
  • Sex Abuse Treatment Center (SATC) – 24/7 Hotline for sexual assault victims at (808) 524-7273
Insurance: Request for Confidential Communications
If you are a student under your parent’s health insurance plan, you may contact your insurance carrier to request for confidential communications such that insurance information is directly sent to you.  If not having confidential communications with your insurer is a barrier to you accessing necessary mental health resources then that can be considered “endangerment”.  The form can be accessed on the HMSA website.  For other insurance carriers, you may need to talk to member services to obtain the form.
Here you will find wellness support and activities created by JABSOM students for JABSOM students.

JABSOM Student Created Wellness Website
The JABSOM Student Wellness Website was created by JABSOM students, for JABSOM students.  The website includes mental health resources, wellness opportunities, tips from fellow students, pick-me-ups, and Learning Community modules.
Walk With a Future Doc (WWAFD)
Class of 2022 Ombudsman, Ken Stridiron, along with other JABSOM medical students, started WWAFD, a branch of the national organization Walk with a Doc (WWAD), to create a bridge between the medical students of JABSOM and its community.  WWAFD is committed to creating healthier lifestyles and exercise through walking.

WWAFD events begin with a brief presentation on a health topic followed by a walk together around Kakaako Waterfront Park.  The walks take place every 4th Sunday of the month.  However, it is always best to contact WWAFD at walkwithadocjabsom@gmail.com regarding upcoming walks.

Mauli
Mauli is a student-initiated, and student-run journal for the arts and humanities of the John A. Burns School of Medicine (JABSOM) and its greater medical community.  It showcases creative works of any focus submitted by JABSOM affiliates.  We believe that the arts and the humanities are essential to the development of a physician and recognize the value of the creative process in all stages of premedical, graduate, and continuing medical education.

Please visit the Mauli webpage for current and past issues, submission information, and Mauli events.

To learn about how a medical student’s firsthand experiences as a hospital patient inspired the creation of Mauli, visit JABSOM UH Med Now and University of Hawaii News.

Holistic Health Student Interest Group (HHIG)
The Holistic Health Student Interest Group (HHIG) is for medical students who wish to learn more about complementary and integrative methods of healing.  The formation of HHIG was spearheaded by Monet Cheung (Class of 2020) and Sidra Parveen to create spaces for, and to empower others with personal agency regarding their health and well-being.  Previous presentation and activities have included:

  • A discussion on physician burnout and medical student well-being that was followed by a students-only discussion about what challenges (and successes) encountered thus far in medical school.  (Stephen Yano, MD Pediatrician, Instructor for The Healer’s Art course)
  • “What is Qi?” and Traditional Chinese Medicine’s Five Element Theory and the basic principles of acupuncture.  (Paige Yang, L.Ac, DACM)
  • Functional Medicine (In Partnership with the Vegetarian Society of Hawaii) A presentation on functional medicine and food as medicine.  (Laurie Marbas, MD)
  • Mindfulness based stress reduction workshop  (Ashley Ono, MD, hospitalist at Straub Medical Center, where she also offers mindfulness workshops for physicians and other healthcare providers.)
  • Addressing SARS-CoV-2/COVID-19 Distress & Maintaining Mental Health  (Anthony Guerrero, MD, JABSOM Department of Psychiatry)

For more information on HHIG and its activities, email jabsomhhig@gmail.com.

It can be difficult to know how to support a friend or classmate who you are concerned about.  If you are concerned about a classmate and unsure what to do, you can contact Dr. Burgess or Dr. Teranishi, or suggest the student seek out support directly from JABSOM’s Confidential Counselor (you can find more information under the Confidential Counselor, JABSOM section in the Counseling and Mental Health Support & Services tab).

The UH Manoa’s Counseling and Student Development Center (CSDC) is offering free access to Kognito – an online program that can equip you with knowledge and skills to recognize trauma or distress.  Kognito At-Risk for Students allows students to practice conversations with a simulated friend in distress and develop a self-care plan with the guidance from a virtual coach.  Modules can be completed in multiple sittings and the whole program takes approximately 45 minutes to complete.  Participants receive a certificate of completion and can use the program as many times as they wish.

To access the Kognito At-Risk for Students simulation:

  1. Go to the Kognito website
  2. Create a new account (please be sure to read the privacy policy)
  3. Use enrollment key: manoastudent
  4. Follow the on-screen instructions
  5. Choose your simulation and click “LAUNCH”
We are currently in the process of updating the Student Well-Being Handbook; however, feel free to browse through our older version of the Student Well-Being Handbook.
At JABSOM, students will find a variety of wellness offerings.  Please refer to the Student Wellness page for the JABSOM Wellness Corner Newsletter which includes a comprehensive listing of wellness activities at JABSOM.

Kakaako Wellness Classes
Kakaako Wellness Classes are taught by instructors who volunteer their time to provide students with free access to wellness activities.

  • Classes are held in the UH Cancer Center’s Wellness Center
  • Class participants need to fill out consent and emergency contact forms.  Forms need to be filled out for each class (eg., form for Yoga, form for Zumba, etc.).  Forms are available from each instructor and are valid for the academic year.
  • Due to COVID, in-person classes were put on hold; however, we are slowly re-integrating modified in-person classes back into the schedule.  For more information, please see the listing of Kakaako Wellness Classes below.

Kakaako Wellness Classes:

HULA
Classes are on hold pending new instructor.  Mahalo nui to Kumu Hula Jessica Warmoth for graciously volunteering her time to teach and share her love of hula with the JABSOM and UHCC community for the past seven years.  We wish her the best in retirement!

ZUMBA
Starting June 1, 2022, Zumba classes are no longer offered.

YOGA
In person classes are currently on hold.

TAI CHI CHUAN (TAIJIQUAN)
In person classes have resumed.
Wednesdays, 6:00 – 7:00pm with simultaneous Zoom option
Class Coordinator:  Chip Ellis
Class Information:  Tai Chi Chuan (Taijiquan) is frequently viewed as a slow motion form of Chinese moving meditation, exercise, or martial art. Millions of people around the world practice this art as a way to relieve stress, gain flexibility, strength, and mental focus.  It is useful to improve balance and enhance health.  Dating back to the 1700’s in China, it began as a powerful martial art.  In the 1930’s it was popularized across China, and by the 1950’s it had spread around the world.  The Wednesday class is presented by instructors from The Hawaii Wushu Center who have 40+ years of experience practicing and teaching this art.  For more information, please visit the following websites: Hawaii Wushu Center or Chip Ellis.

Please contact Chip Ellis at (808) 457-5844 or cellis@ucera.org if you have questions or would like to join the class via Zoom.

BAGUA ZHANG (BAGUAZHANG)
In person classes have resumed starting May 2022.
Thursdays, 6:15 – 7:45pm with simultaneous Zoom option
Class Coordinator:  Chip Ellis
Class Information:  Bagua Zhang (Baguazhang) is a powerful Chinese martial that was developed in the 1800’s and was used by the security forces of the Forbidden City in Beijing, China, in the early 1900’s.  It is widely known in China, but is not that familiar to those in other parts of the world.  It features vigorous movements and provides the player with a good workout, and self-defense skills.  The Thursday class instructor is from The Hawaii Wushu Center and has 40+ years of experience practicing and teaching this art. For more information on the art, please visit the Yin Family Baguazhang website.

Please contact Chip Ellis at (808) 457-5844 or cellis@ucera.org if you have questions or would like to join the class via Zoom.

PING PONG CLUB
Monday, Tuesday, Friday 5:00 – 7:00pm
Class Information:  The UH Cancer Center Ping Pong Club is where top players can meet and train along with faculty, staff and students from the University of Hawaii.  The Ping Pong Club was founded and is run by Dr. Michele Carbone.  The club is fortunate to have Carlos Ko, the number one Nationally ranked player in the State of Hawaiʻi for the past 10 years, serve as an advisor.  At this time due to COVID-19 protocols, a maximum of 12 players are allowed in the room at any given time.  There are 4 tables, which normally accommodate a maximum of 8 players.  If you are interested in joining the club, you may contact Carlos at (808) 688-3356 to see when there is space available.

UH Counseling & Student Development Center Workshops
The UH Counseling & Student Development Center (CSDC) provides an array of workshops and support spaces for students.

Current workshops include:  A Mindful Way through a Pandemic, Better Sleep for Better Health, and Time & Stress Management.

JABSOM Mindful Practice Group
Trained JABSOM facilitators host sessions sharing various topics, perspectives and experiences students might find helpful during this pandemic.

Sessions are held on the first Friday of every month from 1:00-1:30 (30 minutes) via Zoom.

For more information, contact: uhgme@hawaii.edu or Crystal Costa, costaca@hawaii.edu.

Brain Breaks
Need a break from studies?  Take a “Brain Break” at the JABSOM Health Sciences Library!  The library has an array of activities available to help you “de-stress” – puzzles, coloring books, paint pens & mini canvases, and more!  Did you also know that the library is food and drink friendly?  Feel free to eat and drink in the lobby, lab, and other common areas.  (Only bottle water allowed in stacks.)  To top it off the faculty and staff at the library are welcoming, friendly, and a great source of support.
Mauli
Mauli is a student-initiated, and student-run journal for the arts and humanities of the John A. Burns School of Medicine (JABSOM) and its greater medical community.  It showcases creative works of any focus submitted by JABSOM affiliates.  We believe that the arts and the humanities are essential to the development of a physician and recognize the value of the creative process in all stages of premedical, graduate, and continuing medical education.

Please visit the Mauli webpage for current and past issues, submission information, and Mauli events.

Walk With a Future Doc (WWAFD)
Walk With A Future Doc (WWAFD) is a national organization that aims to bring physical activity, health education, and social connection to our community.  WWAFD events begin with a brief presentation on a health topic followed by a walk together around Kakaako Waterfront Park.  The walks take place every 4th Sunday of the month.  In addition to a nice walk around the park and a great company, water and snacks are provided!  Contact WWAFD at walkwithadocjabsom@gmail.com.
Holistic Health Student Interest Group (HHIG)
The Holistic Health Student Interest Group (HHIG) is for medical students who wish to learn more about complementary and integrative methods of healing.  It seeks to empower others with personal agency regarding their health and well-being.  Previous presentation and activities have included:

  • A discussion on physician burnout and medical student well-being that was followed by a students-only discussion about what challenges (and successes) encountered thus far in medical school.  (Stephen Yano, MD Pediatrician, Instructor for The Healer’s Art course)
  • “What is Qi?” and Traditional Chinese Medicine’s Five Element Theory and the basic principles of acupuncture.  (Paige Yang, L.Ac, DACM)
  • Functional Medicine (In Partnership with the Vegetarian Society of Hawaii) A presentation on functional medicine and food as medicine.  (Laurie Marbas, MD)
  • Mindfulness based stress reduction workshop  (Ashley Ono, MD, hospitalist at Straub Medical Center, where she also offers mindfulness workshops for physicians and other healthcare providers.)
  • Addressing SARS-CoV-2/COVID-19 Distress & Maintaining Mental Health  (Anthony Guerrero, MD, JABSOM Department of Psychiatry)

For more information on HHIG and its activities, email jabsomhhig@gmail.com.

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